ConservatoriesFAQ’s

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FAQ’s

FAQ

  • Do I need a building permit and what does this involve?
  • What colours are available?
  • What are the choices with glass?
  • ​Will the conservatory require heating?
  • Can the conservatory be opened up to the rest of the house?
  • How long will the project take?
  • What other issues could arise with zoning, body corporates, resource consents etc?
  • What type of foundation and floor is required?

Do I need a building permit and what does this involve?

A free standing closed in structure under 5m2 does not require a permit.
Closing in an existing patio, veranda or similar structure under 5m2 does not require a permit.
Building work in connection with a porch or a veranda that is attached to an existing building and is on the ground or 1st storey level and does not exceed 20m2 in size, does not require a permit.
Any other conservatory or sunroom will require a permit.
The owner must agree with the conservatory manufacturers as to whose responsibility it is to obtain the necessary consents before construction begins.
To obtain a permit, design drawings must first be completed and then engineering calculations, for the structure as designed, must be provided.

What colours are available?
We have a standard range of 35 powder coat colours and 6 anodised colours. More information can be found here.

What are the choices with glass?
Roof glazing will need to be safety glass and it would be normal to specify a solar control option for anti fading and also double glazing to control condensation and heat loss. New Zealand glazing standards will dictate human impact and protection from falling requirements.
Other considerations include double glazing to walls and tinted glass for privacy.

Will the conservatory require heating?
The Auckland climate is such that conservatories seldom require additional heating, careful selection of glass will suffice in most cases.

Can the conservatory be opened up to the rest of the house?
In some cases a door between the house and the conservatory will be required to control heat losses from the existing house.
This door may be existing but if a window exists it can be replaced by a door. Some of the best conservatories we have completed are where the wall between the house and the conservatory is removed to create a large open space.

How long will the project take?
2-3 months to get plans and engineering details onto a plan to present to council, another month in council and maybe extra time if the council has queries, or requires resource consents.
Once permitted the manufacture time is 4 weeks and then 3 weeks on site to install. Total time frame is 5-6 months.

What other issues could arise with zoning, body corporates, resource consents etc?
Every conservatory project is unique in terms of location, complexity and design. In some cases aspects of the design may require further consideration by the council or permission from neighbours or a body corporate.
Is the property on a subdivided section, will the conservatory be close to the boundary? The council could also be interested in flooding assessments, stability hazards and permability issues in some specific cases.
A resource consent application can be made, at an extra cost, for the council to asses the impact on the environment.

What type of foundation and floor is required?
Many of our conservatories originate from the desire to close in an exposed deck. In some cases this can be achieved with no further work required to the deck. New council requirements may require a damp course or additional strengthening to upgrade to a habitual space.
A crawl space under a timber deck is required but if this is not available a concrete foundation and poured concrete floor can be used. Insulation to subwalls is a good idea if linings need to be removed to inspect for rot or decay.

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